Jony Ive:”you have to understand there are measures of focus, and one of them is how often you say no”

Q: How do you clear away — this is almost an organizational question, but it’s an essential question, and in any creative enterprise — clear away the — forgive me — the crap of everyday concerns and meetings that are of modest interest, et cetera, and think down the line in essential ways. How do you organize that? How did you figure out how to do it in your place of work?

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IVE: Well, I — I — I mean, this — this is something very literally I had the most wonderful teacher in Steve, and I have never — I have never met anybody with his focus. And the — the — the efforts — its not you decide to be focused one month and you strung (ph) along, but the hourly, the daily extraordinary effort that it takes to focus.

And I remember sort of early on when we were working, and he was saying that, Jony, you have to understand there are measures of focus, and one of them is how often you say no. And we — we got into this incredibly patronizing deal where he would ask me how often I said no, and I would make stuff up, and one night — no, that’s not quite true. I didn’t make it up, but I wasn’t interested in doing something. So to say no was — was without great sacrifice.

source : https://9to5mac.com/2017/10/06/jony-ive-new-yorker-techfest-live/

Kip Thorne:”You need to love work or you should be doing something else”

Q:There’s a 300-year legacy of understanding gravity. What advice would you give to us young LIGO scientists to carry this legacy forward for at least another half century?
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Thorne: [Laughs] I don’t think I have any one piece of advice. I have a general piece of advice: that to have a big impact on science requires a lot of intense work. You need to love work or you should be doing something else. It’s been a great joy to be involved in this quest but it’s not so much a joy of the ultimate success, which we have thanks to your generation, but it is the joy of the process.
To be successful both in science and in life, I think, in the modern era where technology is as advanced as it is, daily life is as comfortable as it is (for at least most people in the US), I think one should be doing something one is enthusiastic about but that also has some significant impact on others.
“Kip Thorne is one of the Winners of 2017 Physics Nobel prize.”
source : https://thewire.in/34072/its-your-generation-of-experimenters-that-makes-me-look-good-an-interview-with-kip-thorne/

Sachin Tendulkar :Most things are temporary, your cricket will also be temporary”

Q: On how you raised in a middle-class home, transmits values to your kids:

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Sachin: I think it has a lot to do with interaction. My father never told me what was right or wrong. He guided me, but most of the things I learned came from watching him. He never told me that I had to be humble, I just watched him [being humble himself] and I said, “This is how I want to be in life.”

The most important advice he gave me was when he said, “Most things are temporary, your cricket will also be temporary because at some stage you will stop. But something that stays permanently with you is your nature, the person you are. So try and be a good person. People will appreciate that even after you’ve stopped playing.” So I try and tell my children the same thing.

source : http://keepingscore.blogs.time.com/2012/05/09/ive-got-to-be-myselt-the-sachin-tendulkar-interview/

Leo Babauta :”even in good times, people spend too much”

Q : Do you think [financial problems are] essential for people to finally realize the consequences of [materialism]?
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Leo Babauta : I think financial problems highlight the underlying problems of excessive consumerism, so yes, that does tend to help. But it’s not necessary — even in good times, people spend too much and then spend too much time working, to end up with a bunch of worthless possessions (and often too much fat as a result of consumerism). If they can see, by the shining example of minimalists, that by letting go of all of that you can work less, be happier, have time for what’s important, be healthier, reduce your impact on the environment … maybe they’ll join us. I definitely think that leading by example, and starting a community-wide discussion on these important issues, is the way to start this movement.

Frank Sinatra :”Most of what has been written about me is one big blur”

Playboy: Of the thousands of words which have been written about you on this subject, do you recall any which have accurately described this ability?
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Sinatra: Most of what has been written about me is one big blur, but I do remember being described in one simple word that I agree with. It was in a piece that tore me apart for my personal behavior, but the writer said that when the music began and I started to sing, I was “honest.” That says it as I feel it. Whatever else has been said about me personally is unimportant. When I sing, I believe. I’m honest. If you want to get an audience with you, there’s only one way. You have to reach out to them with total honesty and humility. This isn’t a grandstand play on my part; I’ve discovered—and you can see it in other entertainers—when they don’t reach out to the audience, nothing happens. You can be the most artistically perfect performer in the world, but an audience is like a broad—if you’re indifferent, endsville. That goes for any kind of human contact: a politician on television, an actor in the movies, or a guy and a gal. That’s as true in life as it is in art.
source : Playboy interview archives

Kazuo Ishiguro: “one of the things that’s interested me always is how we live in small worlds and big worlds at the same time”

Q: I suppose what you have been writing about all this time, in a way, is that question of our place in the world, our connection to each other, our connection with the world. That is perhaps the theme you explore the most, do you think?

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KI: Yes, I would say so, I mean I think … If I could put it a little bit more narrowly that that, I mean it’s probably … one of the things that’s interested me always is how we live in small worlds and big worlds at the same time, that we have a personal arena in which we have to try and find fulfilment and love. But that inevitably intersects with a larger world, where politics, or even dystopian universes, can prevail. So I think I’ve always been interested in that. We live in small worlds and big worlds at the same time and we can’t, you know, forget one or the other.

Yayoi Kusama :”In recent years the world has become unpeaceful and full of turmoil”

Q: You once said: “I create art for the healing of all mankind.” Is this vision already partially fulfilled for you?
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Yayoi Kusama :In my decades of work, I have always thought of humankind’s love and world peace. I fight pain, anxiety, and fear every day, and the only method I have found that relieves my illness is to keep creating art. In recent years the world has become unpeaceful and full of turmoil. As an artist, I think it is important to share the love and peace and hope to deliver that to people who are suffering and do not have the opportunity to enjoy the joy of art. The fact that I paint helps me to keep away thoughts of death for myself.