Lin Dan:”I don’t choose a commercial only based on money issues”

Badzine: How do you choose the commercials you go for?

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Lin Dan: First, I don’t choose a commercial only based on money issues.  I must consider whether the product is suitable for me.  Second, I don’t readily agree to do commercials for food or pharmaceuticals since people regard me as their hero and idol, and I must be responsible for them.  That’s also the reason why I am so cautious in choosing products I endorse

Source :http://www.badzine.net/2013/08/superstar-lin-dan-talks-to-badzine/

Orhan Pamuk:”I think that fiction teaches us something essential about life”

Interviewer  : A year ago, a very famous Dutch art critic came into my house and saw all my books and said, “What a waste of time to read all those novels.” For him literature is something that is really dead.

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Orhan Pamuk: I would say that his kind of understanding of reading literature, which implies that one could have done something more useful with one’s time, is very utilitarian. I think it is very premodern to look at books as objects that will educate you, or benefit you, or to consider reading as an intellectual investment you could somehow rely on in the future. With his statement, this art critic implies that, unfortunately, reading literature is a wrong investment. Right?

Interviewer: Yes.

Orhan Pamuk: Well, I think that fiction teaches us something essential about life. I have learned a lot about life from fiction — from Dostoyevsky, from Tolstoy. My understanding of major categories of life comes from fiction rather than the laws of psychology. But I will tell you something. For me, the urge to write and read fiction is not utilitarian. Instead it is like playing with toys. When I was a kid, I just wanted to play with my brother, or with this toy or that toy, without knowing why. The instinct to write fiction has that aspect, and the instinct to read fiction has that aspect.

Source : http://bidoun.org/articles/orhan-pamuk

Miyazaki: “We need to be open to the powers of imagination, which brings something useful to reality

Q: Do you believe in the necessity of fantasy in telling children’s stories?

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Miyazaki: I believe that fantasy in the meaning of imagination is very important. We shouldn’t stick too close to everyday reality but give room to the reality of the heart, of the mind, and of the imagination. Those things can help us in life. But we have to be cautious in using this word fantasy. In Japan, the word fantasy these days is applied to everything from TV shows to video games, like virtual reality. But virtual reality is a denial of reality. We need to be open to the powers of imagination, which brings something useful to reality. Virtual reality can imprison people. It’s a dilemma I struggle with in my work, that balance between imaginary worlds and virtual worlds.

source : http://www.midnighteye.com/interviews/hayao-miyazaki/

Jony Ive:”you have to understand there are measures of focus, and one of them is how often you say no”

Q: How do you clear away — this is almost an organizational question, but it’s an essential question, and in any creative enterprise — clear away the — forgive me — the crap of everyday concerns and meetings that are of modest interest, et cetera, and think down the line in essential ways. How do you organize that? How did you figure out how to do it in your place of work?

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IVE: Well, I — I — I mean, this — this is something very literally I had the most wonderful teacher in Steve, and I have never — I have never met anybody with his focus. And the — the — the efforts — its not you decide to be focused one month and you strung (ph) along, but the hourly, the daily extraordinary effort that it takes to focus.

And I remember sort of early on when we were working, and he was saying that, Jony, you have to understand there are measures of focus, and one of them is how often you say no. And we — we got into this incredibly patronizing deal where he would ask me how often I said no, and I would make stuff up, and one night — no, that’s not quite true. I didn’t make it up, but I wasn’t interested in doing something. So to say no was — was without great sacrifice.

source : https://9to5mac.com/2017/10/06/jony-ive-new-yorker-techfest-live/

Kip Thorne:”You need to love work or you should be doing something else”

Q:There’s a 300-year legacy of understanding gravity. What advice would you give to us young LIGO scientists to carry this legacy forward for at least another half century?
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Thorne: [Laughs] I don’t think I have any one piece of advice. I have a general piece of advice: that to have a big impact on science requires a lot of intense work. You need to love work or you should be doing something else. It’s been a great joy to be involved in this quest but it’s not so much a joy of the ultimate success, which we have thanks to your generation, but it is the joy of the process.
To be successful both in science and in life, I think, in the modern era where technology is as advanced as it is, daily life is as comfortable as it is (for at least most people in the US), I think one should be doing something one is enthusiastic about but that also has some significant impact on others.
“Kip Thorne is one of the Winners of 2017 Physics Nobel prize.”
source : https://thewire.in/34072/its-your-generation-of-experimenters-that-makes-me-look-good-an-interview-with-kip-thorne/

Sachin Tendulkar :Most things are temporary, your cricket will also be temporary”

Q: On how you raised in a middle-class home, transmits values to your kids:

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Sachin: I think it has a lot to do with interaction. My father never told me what was right or wrong. He guided me, but most of the things I learned came from watching him. He never told me that I had to be humble, I just watched him [being humble himself] and I said, “This is how I want to be in life.”

The most important advice he gave me was when he said, “Most things are temporary, your cricket will also be temporary because at some stage you will stop. But something that stays permanently with you is your nature, the person you are. So try and be a good person. People will appreciate that even after you’ve stopped playing.” So I try and tell my children the same thing.

source : http://keepingscore.blogs.time.com/2012/05/09/ive-got-to-be-myselt-the-sachin-tendulkar-interview/

Leo Babauta :”even in good times, people spend too much”

Q : Do you think [financial problems are] essential for people to finally realize the consequences of [materialism]?
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Leo Babauta : I think financial problems highlight the underlying problems of excessive consumerism, so yes, that does tend to help. But it’s not necessary — even in good times, people spend too much and then spend too much time working, to end up with a bunch of worthless possessions (and often too much fat as a result of consumerism). If they can see, by the shining example of minimalists, that by letting go of all of that you can work less, be happier, have time for what’s important, be healthier, reduce your impact on the environment … maybe they’ll join us. I definitely think that leading by example, and starting a community-wide discussion on these important issues, is the way to start this movement.