Rober Bresson:”Money is becoming people’s God. God doesn’t exist anymore for many”

Stéphane told me that your new film was going to be about a young man that kills himself-no, that arranges for his own death by protest. And I replied, I find it very hard to believe that any character in a film by Bresson would kill himself for anything other than internal reasons.

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Rober Bresson: You know, there are young people who kill themselves for this same reason that he does in my film. I think in the whole world things are going very badly. People are becoming more and more materialistic and cruel, but cruel in another way than in the middle ages. Cruel by laziness, by indifference, egotism, because they think only about themselves and not at all about what is happening around them, so that they let everything grow ugly, stupid. They are all interested in money only. Money is becoming their God. God doesn’t exist anymore for many. Money is becoming something you must live for. You know, even your astronauts, the first one who put his foot on the moon, said that when he first saw our earth, he said it is something so miraculous, so marvelous, don’t spoil it, don’t touch it. More deeply I feel the rotten way they are spoiling the earth. All the countries. Silence doesn’t exist anymore; you can’t find it. That, for me, would make it impossible to live. The way this young person wants to die — he doesn’t kill himself, himself—he makes himself be killed. The old Robin Hood people used to commit suicide with the help of friends. He kills himself for a big purpose.

source:   https://scrapsfromtheloft.com/2017/06/03/robert-bresson-possibly-interview-paul-schrader-1976/

 

Rima Das :” I had no option but to do everything on my own. I had run out of money”

You’ve been called a one-woman army. Why did you decide to do it all on your own?

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Rima Das : I had no option but to do everything on my own. I had run out of money while making Antardrishti: Man With The Binoculars, my first feature film. So, when I started filming Village Rockstars I didn’t have the money to engage professionals. Besides, VR is a story about children, by children. This was a tough project. Working with non-actors, especially children who have never acted before, I knew I would need to spend time with them, feel their energy and conduct extensive workshops. This meant I couldn’t have a tight schedule in place. If I had engaged professionals, I would have naturally had to limit this exploration within a time frame and that would mean compromising on many aspects. The story began to develop as I started shooting, therefore I guess I needed the flexibility and freedom.

Source : http://www.vervemagazine.in/people/boss-lady-rima-das-on-village-rockstars-and-why-realism-is-intrinsic-to-good-cinema

Pedro Almodovor: “I have no real interest in films that have to do with superheroes and sequels, prequels, reboots…”

What do you think about the state of Hollywood movies?

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Almodovor: It’s very difficult for me to go to the theater and find movies that I love — much more difficult than before. Maybe I’m getting old. Either that or I find it more difficult for a story to surprise me. I think that film right now is worse than it used to be. For example, I don’t think that you see the kinds of films you saw in the ’60s or the ’70s.

I have no real interest in films that have to do with superheroes and sequels, prequels, reboots — all this kind of business. Ironically, on some level, the fact that movies are so technically proficient works against them. I used to be interested in the adventure film or any chase film before the effects were so perfect. The digital, the synthetic aspect of the image, has taken some of that away from me. There was a sense of danger that was exciting.

Source : https://variety.com/2016/film/news/pedro-almodovar-interview-julieta-director-1201941446/

Ai Weiwei :”I believe that all these crises are man-made, so man has to find a solution now”

Q:  What can each and every one of us do to stop this human crisis, as you call it?

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Ai Weiwei :We’ve always hoped and thought that in the 21st century, we would have better conditions through globalization and greater tolerance regarding political situations. But today there are more borders than ever and it seems as if we’re strongly divided. We have to start really dealing with this situation instead of repressing it.

I believe that all these crises are man-made, so man has to find a solution now. We all have to believe that we have the power to bring about change. If we lose that faith, we will also lose our hope, our trust, and our humanity.

Source : https://i-d.vice.com/en_us/article/8x575z/i-have-no-home-an-interview-with-ai-weiwei

Miyazaki: “We need to be open to the powers of imagination, which brings something useful to reality

Q: Do you believe in the necessity of fantasy in telling children’s stories?

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Miyazaki: I believe that fantasy in the meaning of imagination is very important. We shouldn’t stick too close to everyday reality but give room to the reality of the heart, of the mind, and of the imagination. Those things can help us in life. But we have to be cautious in using this word fantasy. In Japan, the word fantasy these days is applied to everything from TV shows to video games, like virtual reality. But virtual reality is a denial of reality. We need to be open to the powers of imagination, which brings something useful to reality. Virtual reality can imprison people. It’s a dilemma I struggle with in my work, that balance between imaginary worlds and virtual worlds.

source : http://www.midnighteye.com/interviews/hayao-miyazaki/

Yayoi Kusama :”In recent years the world has become unpeaceful and full of turmoil”

Q: You once said: “I create art for the healing of all mankind.” Is this vision already partially fulfilled for you?
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Yayoi Kusama :In my decades of work, I have always thought of humankind’s love and world peace. I fight pain, anxiety, and fear every day, and the only method I have found that relieves my illness is to keep creating art. In recent years the world has become unpeaceful and full of turmoil. As an artist, I think it is important to share the love and peace and hope to deliver that to people who are suffering and do not have the opportunity to enjoy the joy of art. The fact that I paint helps me to keep away thoughts of death for myself.

Anish Kapoor :”there are good artists and bad artists, or not-so-good artists”

Q: One of my professors at University in Delhi said that the difference between Eastern art and Western art, meaning literature as well, was that the Indian artist, in following a tradition, was making work for the audience, to please his audience. Whereas Western art was an expression of an individual experience.

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Image Source : internet

AK : I don’t think that’s true at all. Because there are good artists and bad artists, or not-so-good artists. This kind of East-West stuff is rubbish. I mean, for me, being an Indian artist is not important. What is interesting is that there have been a significant number, since the mid-19th century—everyone from Van Gogh to Picasso—of European artists who have been able to look East. Van Gogh was hugely influenced by Japanese prints. Evidently, Matisse was, and Picasso by African art. They’ve been able to look to the other world and make that part of the Western tradition. It’s never happened the other way around. Not significantly, other than Tagore, who we think of as one shining example, but it’s almost never happened. I think there’s actually a prejudice there. I don’t think it’s allowed to happen which is why it doesn’t happen. Every time there is some move by an Eastern artist, or a non-European artist making something which uses some kind of Western idiom or some combination of the two, it’s always seen as influenced. This is a way of putting things down. It’s only recently, really recently, Salman Rushdie and others now, are beginning to deal with something which allows for a real opening up of both traditions. Traditional art, Eastern or Western, can’t happen any more. What’s got to happen is something else. Folk art really only happens in very closed societies, like the work of Tibetan monks, folk art, or tribal art, in India or in Africa, in closed circumstances. I think that’s a battle that really has to be fought hard.

It’s something I’m trying to do myself, in making my work more than stones with holes in them. How does one bring in all sorts of other things which aren’t represented by the matter that’s there?

Source : http://bombmagazine.org/article/1273/