Richard Linklater: ” I was always intrigued by what people said”

Q: Why is it that your movies are so verbally driven? Almost all of them are built around conversation and speech. Do you see language and verbal expression as the place where we really see who people are?

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Linklater : Well, I always thought so. If you look at the world around you, we define ourselves more by speech. I remember Sam Fuller saying, “You don’t talk about things. You show it.” And I said, “He’s right. That is cinema.” But when I turned on the camera, it really was about people talking. That was the world I had experienced. I hadn’t been to a war. I hadn’t been a crime reporter. I was always intrigued by what people said, what that meant about what they were saying, and what that betrayed about them—regardless of whether what they were saying made any sense or not. I had done that first film [It’s Impossible to Learn to Plough by Reading Books] that’s very much a kind of structural thing that was about a lack of communication. And in Slacker I wanted a world where the interior was brought forth—kind of like in theater. That’s just the way it came out once I really started to do stuff that felt personal to me. It was people just rapping, talking a lot, with not much going on, technically speaking. It wasn’t really conscious. I’m not that verbal. I’m more of an observer than a talker. So I was as surprised as anybody, really, that that’s how it came out.

Source : https://www.filmcomment.com/article/lost-in-america-richard-linklater-interview/

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Darren Aronofsky:”when you’re limited by your resources you have to get more creative

Q: Do you think that the “money-first, movie-second” quagmire many young filmmakers must face hinders their creativity?

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DA: No, I think it totally expands your creativity. The problem with many big-budget films is that they have the money, and then they’re just walking though the moves. I think when you’re limited by your resources you have to get more creative. Your boundaries create your reality, and within that reality, you try to turn those limitations into your strengths. The bottom line is that if something doesn’t work, you have to cut it. You can’t just say, “Well, it was three o’clock in the morning, and my actor was barfing, and it was cold, and that’s why it looks like this.” You can’t do that. Either it works or it doesn’t work. Period. The end. So we didn’t even want to get into that situation. We basically asked, “What can we do?” And once we knew, we said, “Let’s push it as far as we can and make it as exceptional as we can in that direction.”

Source : http://www.avclub.com/article/darren-aronofsky-13537

 

 

 

Create from your own experience: Michael Haneke

INTERVIEWER
But would you say that drawing from one’s own experience and background is always good—or even necessary?
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HANEKE
I’ve never seen good results from people trying to speak about things they don’t know firsthand. They will talk about Afghanistan, about children in Africa, but in the end they only know what they’ve seen on TV or read in the newspaper. And yet they pretend—even to themselves—that they know what they’re saying. But that’s bullshit. I’m quite convinced that I don’t know anything except for what is going on around me, what I can see and perceive every day, and what I have experienced in my life so far. These are the only things I can rely on. Anything else is merely the pretense of knowledge with no depth. Of course, I don’t just write about things precisely as they have happened to me—some have and some haven’t. But at least I try to invent stories with which I can personally identify.