Bill Mollison:”Grow your own food”

London: Short of starting a farm, what can we do to make our cities more sustainable?

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Mollison: Catch the water off your roof. Grow your own food. Make your own energy. It’s insanely easy to do all that. It takes you less time to grow your food than to walk down to the supermarket to buy it. Ask any good organic gardener who mulches how much time he spends on his garden and he’ll say, “Oh, a few minutes every week.” By the time you have taken your car and driven to the supermarket, taken your foraging-trolley and collected your wild greens, and driven back home again, you’ve spent a good hour or two — plus you’ve spent a lot of money.

source: https://scott.london/interviews/mollison.html

 

Dr. Michael Greger:”The processed food industry is a trillion-dollar industry”

Across the Atlantic, Americans, more obese than ever; on their way to death; more information than ever, more money than ever…Why aren’t people listening?

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Dr. Michael Greger: They’re just confused. They don’t know and the industry wants it that way. This is a standard tobacco industry tactic: muddy the water, misinformation, right? Such said, you know, so one day coffee’s good for you, one day coffee’s bad for you. You know, Time magazine put “Butter is back” on the cover. It shows you how desperate they are for dwindling print sales, right? Sells a lot copies, but sells the public short, right? And so people love hearing good news about bad habits, right? If someone comes out with a diet book saying you know broccoli is really good for you, how many books is that going to sell, right? Someone comes out and says bacon and butter is really good for you. You got a bestseller on you! I mean, you know, and the media loves those kinds of stories and so, there’s just these conflicting–

The processed food industry is a trillion-dollar industry. You know, they just hope to confuse people so they’ll throw up their hands, eat whatever is put in front of them. And that’s good for business but not so good for people.

Source : https://scrapsfromtheloft.com/2018/10/07/dr-michael-greger-how-we-are-controlled-by-food-industry/ 

Anthony Bourdain:”There are always delusional people who thought it would be a great idea, who decided to “follow their passion.”

Q: There are so many cooking and food-travel shows now Do you feel like these shows have created a false impression of what it’s like to work in a kitchen?

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Bourdain: Yeah, sure. But anybody who goes in laboring under the assumption or thinking it’s going to be easy or glamorous is going to be very, very quickly dissuaded. They were not going to last. But that was always the case. There are always delusional people who thought it would be a great idea, who decided to “follow their passion.” This was always a lethal instinct. Or almost always a lethal instinct. And I think the genuine problem is that there are a lot of cooking schools around the country who, in a predatory way, have contributed to or have essentially knowingly encouraged people who, in good conscience, should not be encouraged, and leading them to believe that, at 35 years old, they will be able to roll out of this third-tier cooking school, saddled with a huge and often punitive debt, and somehow ever get out from under.

I mean, they’re not telling them that, if you’re 35, you’re going to be grandpa in the kitchen. You’re going to be, chances are, the oldest person in the kitchen. That it is physically hard, and that you’re going to be getting paid shit, if you’re lucky, for the first few years. And if you want to be really good, then you will insist upon getting paid shit, because what you should be doing is working for somebody really, really good for as close to nothing as they’re willing to give you, in return for the experience. So that’s something that I think it would be useful to point out. That if you have a good job, you’re 35 years old, and you think it’s going to be easy, or that you’re going to make a good living, you at least need a realistic picture of what the business is really like before you make a jump or a commitment like that.

I mean, I admire anyone who wants to cook and knowingly enters the field. It’s a hard thing. But, you know, look before you leap. Because I’ve seen that so many times, kids coming out of cooking school and working in my kitchens, and literally two weeks in, you see it. You look behind the line, and you can just see the dream die. This terrible information sinking in, like, “Oh my God, this is nothing like they told me it was going to be.”

Source : https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/anthony-bourdain-interview-appetites-cookbook