Brian Lara :”People are always looking for role models”

Q: How does it feel to be a role model, and how do you take on that responsibility?

Brian-Lara-of-the-West-Indies1

BL: It’s very important. As a sportsman you realise very quickly how short your career is and there’s so much life beyond that. We’re just 1.3 million people. People are always looking for role models, they’re always looking for someone to follow and it’s not like America where around every corner there is a superstar. Trinidad and Tobago is very small so we are straight into the minds of the youngsters in the country and therefore we have a responsibility, like it or not, to give back and reach out to them. I feel honoured to be a role model and I do know my responsibilities and sharing it with others is a good feeling.

Source : http://www.the-report.com/reports/trinidad-tobago/a-caribbean-leader/interview-with-brian-lara-sports-ambassador/

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Lin Dan:”I don’t choose a commercial only based on money issues”

Badzine: How do you choose the commercials you go for?

Lin-Dan

Lin Dan: First, I don’t choose a commercial only based on money issues.  I must consider whether the product is suitable for me.  Second, I don’t readily agree to do commercials for food or pharmaceuticals since people regard me as their hero and idol, and I must be responsible for them.  That’s also the reason why I am so cautious in choosing products I endorse

Source :http://www.badzine.net/2013/08/superstar-lin-dan-talks-to-badzine/

Leonard Cohen : I think my opinions are second-rate

Rogers: But I think in some of the songs that you’ve written there’s such a close relationship with poetry obviously, but form too. There’s a soundtrack to Night Magic where you wrote the lyrics in Spenserian ode form.

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer and writer of Engli

image source : internet

Cohen: I’ve always been interested in form, maybe because I don’t trust my own spontaneous nature to come up with anything interesting, and form imposes a certain opportunity to get deeper than your first thought. There’s a school of poetry that believes first thought, best thought. That would have condemned me to an inauspicious superficiality if I had followed that, because I don’t have any ideas. Irving Layton once said to me, “Leonard is free from ideas.” I don’t have an idea and I don’t trust my opinions. I think my opinions are second-rate, but when you submit yourself to a form, then something happens and you’re invited to dig deeper into the language and to discard the slogans by which you live, the easy alibis of language and of opinion. And if you’re looking in the Spenserian stanza, for instance—which is a very, very intricate verse form—you have to come up with many rhymes of the same sound; you’re invited to explore realms that you usually don’t get to in ordinary, easy thought. I’ve considered my thought stream extremely uninteresting, and it’s only when I can discard it that I find I can say something that I can get behind.

source : https://brickmag.com/an-interview-with-leonard-cohen/