“you’ll have an entire population growing up and going through life and just never really finding joy” -Simon Sinek on Millennials

Instant gratification. You want to go on a date? You don’t even have to learn how to be socially awkward on that first date. You don’t need to learn how to practice that skill. You don’t have to be the uncomfortable person who says yes when you mean no and no when you mean yes. Swipe right – bang – done! You don’t even need to learn the social coping mechanism.

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Everything you want you can have instantaneously. Everything you want, instant gratification, except, job satisfaction and strength of relationships – their ain’t no out for that. They are slow, meandering, uncomfortable, messy processes.

And so millennials are wonderful, idealistic, hardworking smart kids who’ve just graduated school and are in their entry-level jobs and when asked “how’s it going?” they say “I think I’m going to quit.” And we’re like “why?” and they say “I’m not making an impact.” To which we say—“you’ve only been there eight months…”

It’s as if their standing at the foot of a mountain and they have this abstract concept called impact that they want to have on the world, which is the summit. What they don’t see is the mountain. I don’t care if you go up the mountain quickly or slowly, but there’s still a mountain. And so what this young generation needs to learn is patience. That some things that really, really matter, like love or job fulfillment, joy, love of life, self confidence, a skillset, any of these things, all of these things take time. Sometimes you can expedite pieces of it, but the overall journey is arduous and long and difficult and if you don’t ask for help and learn that skillset, you will fall off the mountain. Or the worst case scenario, we’re seeing an increase in suicide rates in this generation, we’re seeing an increase in accidental deaths due to drug overdoses, we’re seeing more and more kids drop out of school or take a leave of absence due to depression. Unheard of. This is really bad.

The best case scenario, you’ll have an entire population growing up and going through life and just never really finding joy. They’ll never really find deep, deep fulfillment in work or in life, they’ll just waft through life and it things will only be “just fine.” “How’s your job?” “It’s fine, same as yesterday…” “How’s your relationship?” “It’s fine…” That’s the best case scenario.

Source : https://scrapsfromtheloft.com/2017/01/09/simon-sinek-on-millennials/

Mooji:” restlessness is only a kind of stimulant, a probing, an encouragement, ultimately, to go deeper”

What is, in your experience, the main cause of inner restlessness?

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Mooji: Inner restlessness will be there because there is a seed planted deeply in us, an impulse to search for the Truth. This divine seed, once sprouted, brings us everlasting peace, silence, stillness, joy and love, but its greatest gift is to awaken us to the Real. However, while we are in the mode of personhood the sense of peace will not be constant; it will only be a visitor because it is based on gratification within the phenomenal realm. Something will always seem to be missing. The human being will feel an enormous range of possibilities and choices in front of him, but no matter what he gets, he will not be completely satisfied. Satisfaction will finally come when he wakes up to the Truth of his real nature. As long as he is living in misunderstanding of his fundamental nature, he will not have complete joy. In the bigger picture, this restlessness is only a kind of stimulant, a probing, an encouragement, ultimately, to go deeper. He will not be able to appreciate this restlessness until he finds that which puts his restlessness to an end, and that will only be when he finds the Truth within himself.

We often come to realize that states which the person initially experiences as being unpleasant actually help him to find his true nature. If you were able to find peace through your false nature, you would never be able to find your true nature. But thankfully you will not find lasting peace in your false nature; it just doesn’t work that way. You will have momentary peace, momentary joy, but not final or ultimate joy, because everything in the realm of the mind and the person is on the clock of duality. It is all temporary, it is all passing. None of it is eternal. This life of the body-mind is not permanent, nor is this role we play here in daily life permanent. However, while this body is still warm, you must make the most of this auspicious opportunity to find that which is not in time, that which is not passing.

Source : http://levekunst.com/interview-with-mooji-awaken-to-the-truth-of-who-you-are/

“Be like a tree, fresh and alive”- Thich Nhat Hanh

Q: It is very painful when someone we love has serious difficulties, such as mental illness, post-traumatic stress disorder, or addiction. Sometimes it feels like their problems are so big that we can’t really help them and so we may want to retreat from them and their problems. At other times, we try to help, and then get consumed by the other person’s struggles. What can we do to help in these difficult situations without getting overwhelmed?

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image source :internet

Thich Nhat Hanh : When you feel overwhelmed, you’re trying too hard. That kind of energy does not help the other person and it does not help you. You should not be too eager to help right away. There are two things: to be and to do. Don’t think too much about to do—to be is first. To be peace. To be joy. To be happiness. And then to do joy, to do happiness—on the basis of being. So first you have to focus on the practice of being. Being fresh. Being peaceful. Being attentive. Being generous. Being compassionate. This is the basic practice. It’s like if the other person is sitting at the foot of a tree. The tree does not do anything, but the tree is fresh and alive. When you are like that tree, sending out waves of freshness, you help to calm down the suffering in the other person.

Your presence should be pleasant, it should be calm, and you should be there for him or her. That is a lot already. When children like to come and sit close to you, it’s not because you have a lot of cookies to give, but because sitting close to you is nice, it’s refreshing. So sit next to the person who is suffering and try your best to be your best—pleasant, attentive, fresh.

source : http://www.lionsroar.com/be-beautiful-be-yourself-january-2012/