Sam Keen:”The first questions we must ask ourselves are “What’s my life about?”

London: In Hymns to an Unknown God, you ask: “Is it possible in this chaotic day and age to have a sense of the sacred in everyday life, or do we have to check our spirits and our god at the workplace door?” Much of what we call spirituality today takes place on Sundays, after work, when the kids are in bed, or when we’re off meditating on our own. Is it possible to make it an integral part of everyday life?

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Keen: I think there is a deep yearning today to figure out how to make a real connection with the sacred. I hear many men say, “I have a good job and make a living, but it doesn’t mean anything to me; I want something with meaning, something I have a reason for doing.” But our society has been eaten up by the economic view of things, which routinely forces us to work at jobs that don’t mean anything. I think we’re inevitably going to be depressed when we focus the major part of our energy and attention on something that doesn’t give us meaning, only material things.

We have to return, I think, to the difficult idea of right livelihood, which Buddhists talk about, or the Christian idea of vocation. The first questions we must ask ourselves are “What’s my life about?” and “What gives me meaning?” Only after that should we ask “How do I make a living?” and “How do I provide for myself?”

Source : https://scott.london/interviews/keen.html

Masanobu Fukuoka: “The more specialized the knowledge, the more the whole picture is lost, and things start to fall apart”

Masanobu Fukuoka:

“Nowadays, everybody in the world is going in the direction of an ever-broadening spiral. Everyone seems to think ‘the bigger the better,” ‘more is better.’ People think they can grow a lot in a large field or a small field. The city culture started from using the scythe, soil, and hammer. That was the beginning of civilization. Now, people think large machines are better. I wonder if that is true! Humanity has made a lot of progress. They climb up the mountains, higher and higher. What do you think is at the end? If the upward spiral reaches the limits of growth, things fall apart at the end. They separate.

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“Even with humanity’s knowledge, like physiology, science and construction, the trend is toward creating ‘experts,’ trained specialists with a narrow band of knowledge.  In the beginning it just separated into two things, and then it branched out into four things, and eventually to eight things, and so on. This progression is also separation.

“Humanity’s progression of development is also separating, just branching out and branching out. The more specialized the knowledge, the more the whole picture is lost, and things start to fall apart. This is the world of humanity’s head. I think humanity’s world is like a balloon and it will eventually explode. Knowledge is falling apart. Very few people are trying to prevent this, including hippies and other conscious people.