Sir Edmund Hillary:” I found fear a very stimulating factor”

Did you enjoy the tingle of fear?

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Sir Edmund Hillary: I think I found fear a very stimulating factor. I’m sure the feeling of fear, as long as you can take advantage of it and not be rendered useless by it, can make you extend yourself beyond what you would regard as your capacity. If you’re afraid, the blood seems to flow freely through the veins and you really do feel a sense of stimulation. If you can summon up your determination and motivation to overcome the fear, you seem to have more energy to tackle the problem and overcome it.

Source : http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1703098,00.html

Jose Gonzalez: “Passion is the idea of engagement – of pursuing something in a positive move”

A grand unified question: What do hope and passion mean to you?

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Jose Gonzalez: To hope something means to wish something, to imagine something and then wish for it to come true. It is something that I am involved with in writing lyrics – I hope – in aiming or articulating a utopia – even if it is not possible to reach. The idea of hoping something could be picturing yourself as an individual in a utopic, euphoric place – or just a comfortable place, whatever that means to anyone. Hope is nice. Depending on your utopia that could be a very strange or even a very negative thing when put into context with other people’s utopias… that is the interesting thing. Passion is the idea of engagement – of pursuing something in a positive move. Nice words. I like the combination. Nothing but hope and passion…

Source : https://nbhap.com/people/jose-gonzalez

Rita Levi-Montalcini “What you do you should do well”

Q: So I am also wondering what advice would you give young people now. Many young people are not interested in science, and it’s a very exciting time, as you mentioned.

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Levi-Montalcini: I’d say, as I always say, that nothing is beautiful as to work on something scientific or social, to be very invested in what you do. I mean, not [to] be afraid, but knowing that you never will go ahead if you don’t do it very seriously and then, as you say, the important [thing] is to be very engaged. What you do you should do well. I will say that it is not as important as scientific or social [work] because I’m also working on social problems, as you know, in Africa. So it is important to know what it is important in life, not just only very simple and stupid things, like being beautiful and successful, this is nonsense.

I always say so, and I have many followers you know. I work here, and I am delighted because excellent people work here, Antonino Cattaneo, Pietro Calissano, I mean, many people, not too many, but some people still understand the importance of being invested in important problems, not in futility.

Source :

https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-physiol-021909-135857

Rita Levi-Montalcini won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1986 with Stanley Cohen, decades after her groundbreaking work in Italy and the United States. The theory she developed was quite elegant and simple. Competition of nerve cells early in development for limited amounts of growth factors produces winners and losers. The winners are nerve cells that made the correct connections with their targets, and the losers undergo death, which explains the massive amount of programmed cell death that occurs in the peripheral nervous system.

Anthony Bourdain:”There are always delusional people who thought it would be a great idea, who decided to “follow their passion.”

Q: There are so many cooking and food-travel shows now Do you feel like these shows have created a false impression of what it’s like to work in a kitchen?

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Bourdain: Yeah, sure. But anybody who goes in laboring under the assumption or thinking it’s going to be easy or glamorous is going to be very, very quickly dissuaded. They were not going to last. But that was always the case. There are always delusional people who thought it would be a great idea, who decided to “follow their passion.” This was always a lethal instinct. Or almost always a lethal instinct. And I think the genuine problem is that there are a lot of cooking schools around the country who, in a predatory way, have contributed to or have essentially knowingly encouraged people who, in good conscience, should not be encouraged, and leading them to believe that, at 35 years old, they will be able to roll out of this third-tier cooking school, saddled with a huge and often punitive debt, and somehow ever get out from under.

I mean, they’re not telling them that, if you’re 35, you’re going to be grandpa in the kitchen. You’re going to be, chances are, the oldest person in the kitchen. That it is physically hard, and that you’re going to be getting paid shit, if you’re lucky, for the first few years. And if you want to be really good, then you will insist upon getting paid shit, because what you should be doing is working for somebody really, really good for as close to nothing as they’re willing to give you, in return for the experience. So that’s something that I think it would be useful to point out. That if you have a good job, you’re 35 years old, and you think it’s going to be easy, or that you’re going to make a good living, you at least need a realistic picture of what the business is really like before you make a jump or a commitment like that.

I mean, I admire anyone who wants to cook and knowingly enters the field. It’s a hard thing. But, you know, look before you leap. Because I’ve seen that so many times, kids coming out of cooking school and working in my kitchens, and literally two weeks in, you see it. You look behind the line, and you can just see the dream die. This terrible information sinking in, like, “Oh my God, this is nothing like they told me it was going to be.”

Source : https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/anthony-bourdain-interview-appetites-cookbook

Lynsey Addario:”One reason we stayed alive is that we stayed calm”

How do you mentally prepare for the risk of a war zone, and what about when a situation turns dangerous? When you’re being forced to lie facedown at gunpoint?

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Lynsey Addario: At least a week before I go on any assignment in a conflict zone, I begin mental preparation. I speak with local journalists and fixers about the situation on the ground, with colleagues who have worked in that specific area recently, and try to update myself on the potential risks. The situation is often fluid during war, and I need to ensure I am aware of all the potential issues that may arise. Familiarizing myself with these things helps with mental preparation. As far as being held at gunpoint or kidnapped, I think there’s a survival mode that kicks in. My mind slows down into an almost catatonic state, where it’s all about enduring whatever I need to endure at that moment. In Libya, I was with very experienced colleagues, and we all knew not to panic. One reason we stayed alive is that we stayed calm.

Source : https://theliteratelens.com/2015/07/06/in-love-and-war-an-interview-with-lynsey-addario/

Kip Thorne:”You need to love work or you should be doing something else”

Q:There’s a 300-year legacy of understanding gravity. What advice would you give to us young LIGO scientists to carry this legacy forward for at least another half century?
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Thorne: [Laughs] I don’t think I have any one piece of advice. I have a general piece of advice: that to have a big impact on science requires a lot of intense work. You need to love work or you should be doing something else. It’s been a great joy to be involved in this quest but it’s not so much a joy of the ultimate success, which we have thanks to your generation, but it is the joy of the process.
To be successful both in science and in life, I think, in the modern era where technology is as advanced as it is, daily life is as comfortable as it is (for at least most people in the US), I think one should be doing something one is enthusiastic about but that also has some significant impact on others.
“Kip Thorne is one of the Winners of 2017 Physics Nobel prize.”
source : https://thewire.in/34072/its-your-generation-of-experimenters-that-makes-me-look-good-an-interview-with-kip-thorne/